Suicide Prevention

  • If you have concerns about a person IN OUR CUSTODY that may be suicidal or in a crisis, we ask that you let a staff member know right away. Please call our facility, at any time, and ask to speak with a Shift Supervisor.

Our number is (413) 858-0195.

  • If you have concerns about a person IN THE COMMUNITY that may be suicidal or or in a crisis, please call the national suicide prevention hotline at 1-800-273-8255 or click on the following link for more information & resources: https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

FACTS ABOUT SUICIDE:

  • Generally speaking, suicidal people do not keep their plans to themselves.
  • Most suicidal people communicate their intent sometime during the week preceding their attempt.
  • It’s wrong to believe those who talk about suicide won’t do it.
  • People who talk about suicide may try, or even complete, an act of self-destruction.
  • Suicide is the most preventable kind of death,and almost any positive action may save a life.
  • If people in a crisis get the help they need,they will probably never be suicidal again.
  • It’s wrong to believe that confronting a person about suicide will only make them angry and increase the risk of suicide.
  • Asking someone directly about suicidal intent lowers anxiety, opens up communication and lowers the risk of an impulsive act.
  • Suicide prevention is everybody’s business, andanyone can help prevent the tragedy of suicide.

SUICIDAL BEHAVIORAL CLUES:

  • Any previous suicide attempt
  • Acquiring a gun or stockpiling pills
  • Co-occurring depression, moodiness, hopelessness
  • Putting personal affairs in order
  • Giving away prized possessions
  • Sudden interest or disinterest in religion
  • Drug or alcohol abuse, or relapse after a period of recovery
  • Unexplained anger, aggression and irritability

SITUATIONAL CLUES:

  • Being
    fired or being expelled from school
  • A recent unwanted move
  • Loss of any major relationship
  • Death of a spouse, child, or best friend (esp.
    if by suicide)
  • Diagnosis of a serious or terminal illness
  • Sudden unexpected loss of freedom/fear of
    punishment
  • Anticipated loss of financial security
  • Loss of a cherished therapist, counselor or
    teacher
  • Fear of becoming a burden to others

TIPS FOR ASKING THE SUICIDE QUESTION:

  • If in doubt, don’t wait, ask the question
  • If the person is reluctant, be persistent
  • Talk to the person alone in a private setting
  • Allow the person to talk freely
  • Give yourself plenty of time
  • Have your resources handy: phone numbers,
    counselor’s name and any other information that might help
  • Remember:
    How you ask the question is less important than that you ask it.

SUICIDAL PEOPLE OFTEN BELIEVE THEY CANNOT BE HELPED, SO YOU MAY HAVE TO DO MORE

  • The best referral involves taking the person
    directly to someone who can help.
  • The next best referral is getting a commitment
    from them to accept help, then making the arrangements to get that help.
  • The third best referral is to give referral
    information and try to get a good faith commitment not to complete or attempt
    suicide.
  • Any willingness to accept help at some time,
    even if in the future, is a good outcome.

RESOURCES

  • National Suicide Lifeline        800-273-TALK (8255)
  • Samaritans                               877-870-HOPE(4673)
  • Brattleboro Retreat